Welcome to the NavList Message Boards.

NavList:

A Community Devoted to the Preservation and Practice of Celestial Navigation and Other Methods of Traditional Wayfinding

Compose Your Message

Message:αβγ
Message:abc
Add Images & Files
    or...
       
    Reply
    Re: A noon sight conundrum (less and less)
    From: Peter Fogg
    Date: 2003 Nov 26, 14:16 +1100

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "George Huxtable" ... It reminds me of the World Maps I have come
    across in Australia, shown with
    > South up, which is a perfectly valid point of view. Some of them show the
    > Australian continent considerably inflated compared with everywhere else,
    > which is somewhat less acceptable.
    
    Having seen a few of these I've never noticed any distortion - could it just
    be the unfamiliar effect of seeing the world inverted, with Australia (big
    enough anyway) sitting at the top? There are also postcards available with
    Australia's outline superimposed on Europe or North America (hopefully in
    correct proportion) that show that this continent (or large island, as you
    like) is  roughly the same size as Europe or the United States.
    
    >  But the prize goes to Tasmania, that
    > small and beautiful island to the South of Australia, where they tend to
    > refer to the Australian mainland as "The North Island", and show maps with
    > an inverted and inflated Tasmania dominating a shrunken mini-Australia
    > below.
    >
     Just as in the Orkney Islands they refer to Scotland just to the south as
    'the Mainland' and see themselves as quite different, which is fair enough,
    being largely descended from Vikings. (Trying to be vaguely on-topic).. the
    Tasmanians particularly resent their island being left off any
    representation of the map, which happens often enough. Having water
    separating lands does effectively isolate them to a remarkable extent, just
    look at how the British Isles have managed to remain so different to the
    rest of Europe in so many ways. When there was a move towards the end of the
    19th century to meld together the separate colonies (now known as states) in
    a united Australia, New Zealand was invited to join, but preferred to go it
    alone, afraid that their isolation would leave them forgotten and
    neglected - like Tasmania but worse.
    
    
    

       
    Reply
    Browse Files

    Drop Files

    NavList

    What is NavList?

    Join NavList

    Name:
    (please, no nicknames or handles)
    Email:
    Do you want to receive all group messages by email?
    Yes No

    You can also join by posting. Your first on-topic post automatically makes you a member.

    Posting Code

    Enter the email address associated with your NavList messages. Your posting code will be emailed to you immediately.
    Email:

    Email Settings

    Posting Code:

    Custom Index

    Subject:
    Author:
    Start date: (yyyymm dd)
    End date: (yyyymm dd)

    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site