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    Re: The mil as a unit of angle.
    From: Richard M Pisko
    Date: 2003 Mar 14, 00:09 -0700

    Back before the dawn of time (on Thu, 13 Mar 2003 15:50:24
    -0400, to be exact), "Trevor J. Kenchington"
     wrote:
    
    >Richard Pisko wrote:
    >
    >>  the old points on a compass rose can
    >> be matched to even numbers on the US mil system.  For
    >> example: 0 is North and 1600 is East.  800 is NE.  400 is
    >> NNE.  200 is N by E.  300 would be NE by N, I think.
    >>
    >> I have no idea what would correspond to 100mils.
    >
    >
    >
    >North one-half East
    
    Thank you.
    
    >300 mils would be North North East one-half North. There is no such
    >thing as North East by North, which would be a full point northward from
    >North East and so identical to North by East (i.e. 200 mil).
    >
    Right.  N by E (200), I see that now, and halfway to NNE
    (400) from there is NNE 1/2 N (300) because it is an odd
    hundred mil number.  You mean I got the others right?  :-)
    But would not 600 mils be NE by N since 800 mils is NE?
    
    >The
    >odd-numbered points are always named from the nearest cardinal or
    >ordinal point (e.g. North or North East), not from the intermediate
    >("inter-ordinal"?) ones like North North East.
    >
    >50 mil would be North one-quarter East and 150 mil North three-quarters
    >East. Again, the quarter points are named from the nearest cardinal or
    >ordinal point.
    >
    So Hitchcock's "North by North West" is a valid designation
    of the direction ... (looking for some paper) ... 5800 mils?
    Or perhaps 326-1/4 degrees?
    
    >
    >Now that wasn't really so hard, was it?
    
    Thank you.  I thought I learned to box the compass up to 32
    points a great many years ago, but I didn't remember the
    half points except as a term in sailing.  Even the 32 were
    obviously blurred in my memory.
    
    >(Not to compare with the
    >complexity of lunars as a way of telling the time anyway!)
    >
    Umm...  Where could I find something that explained the
    lunar system?
    
    There was a brief time period during the French Revolution
    that used a 10 (long) hour day of 100 (long) minutes per
    hour, and ... 100 (short) seconds per minute?  Was one of
    the units called a lunar?  I had a reference one time, but
    it seems to be gone.  Checking the web, I discover there is
    the one time zone, X time, based on dividing the day into
    100,000 as the unit, and starting the day at midnight (zero)
    on the international date line.  Seems similar.
    
    
    >Trevor Kenchington
    
    Yours truly,
    
    
    --
    Richard ...
    
    
    

       
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