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    Re: lv-ab: Trying to "Heave To"
    From: Yanni Nikopoulos
    Date: 2005 Oct 9, 08:24 -0400

    Good comments,
    if anything doesn't work through a storm anchor (parachute) attached to the
    stern with a 40'-50' line
    or just a thick long line like a 3/4 docking line or mooring line and you
    will see the difference
    
    Marinated
    S/V Thalia
    Hamilton
    
    
    
    
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Rosalie B." 
    To: 
    Cc: "LIVE_ABOARD" 
    Sent: Sunday, October 09, 2005 7:32 AM
    Subject: Re: lv-ab: Trying to "Heave To"
    
    
    > On Sun, 9 Oct 2005 02:07:57 -0700, you wrote:
    >
    >> I have NO experience with the boat in question,
    >>but I do have a suggestion.
    >>
    >> First step is always to reduce sail to the
    >>minimum.   "Drop all sail".
    >>Second step is to RAISE MINIMUM MAIN SAIL.
    >>NO JIB. NO STAYSAIL.
    >>THIRD STEP is to set helm, IF YOU CAN.
    >> FORTH step is to raise enough foresail to allow
    >>course control....If desired.
    >>
    >> AT NO TIME is the foresail discussed in a
    >>reasonable approach to this situation.
    >>That is due to the REASONABLE concept that a
    >>foresail may disrupt the situation...
    >>
    >> As long as you are in control of the sheets to
    >>it, leave the AFT sail alone, (the mizzen) as it
    >>should have little effect on the result...
    >> AGAIN, just a recommendation,
    >> Hell I have NO idea what I'm talking about...
    >>Just regurgitating data...
    >
    > You said it.  You have no idea what you are talking about.
    >
    > I don't have much of an idea either, although we have heaved to, just
    > to practice.  Most of the time we don't go out when the weather is
    > such that we'd have to heave to.
    >
    > The idea of heaving to is to make the sails work against each other
    > and the rudder so that the boat stops wiggling around or bashing into
    > the waves.
    >
    >> When a sailboat is set in a heaving to position, she slows down
    >> considerably
    >>and keeps moving forward at about 1 to 2 kts, but with a significant
    >>amount of
    >>drift. The drift creates some turbulence on the water, and that
    >>disturbance
    >>decreases significantly the sea aggressiveness. The pounding felt when
    >>going
    >>upwind in strong seas almost miraculously disappears and the boat does not
    >>heel
    >>as much. This is MUCH more comfortable. It's a little bit like "parking"
    >>the
    >>boat on idle speed. The limitations of this technique are: a)you need
    >>enough
    >>sea room because of the important drift; and b) beyond a certain level of
    >>wind,
    >>other measures need to be taken.  (In winds over 40 its better to drop all
    >>sails
    >>and power slowly straight into the wind, absent obstructions of course)
    >
    > I have no idea how one does this in a ketch, but I know it can be
    > done.
    >
    > grandma Rosalie
    >
    > ___________________________________________________________________________
    > ||  The Live-Aboard List : send a "subscribe" or "unsubscribe" request
    > ||
    > ||  in body of message to:  live-aboard-request@crux.astro.utoronto.ca
    > ||
    >
    >
    
    
    

       
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