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    Re: The flat earth notion
    From: Marvin Sebourn
    Date: 2003 Nov 4, 09:17 EST
    In a message dated 11/4/2003 1:13:41 AM Central Standard Time, gtalge{at}PE.NET writes:
    John Kabel wrote:
    >
    > When I was young, I worked a few summers with my father as a carpenter.
    > One of his lead hands was a Mennonite, and he had an interesting mix of old-
    > and new-World views.  He had great difficulty believing in the Apollo moon
    > missions, and insisted that the Earth was flat.  But he drove a car and
    > used power tools without difficulty.
    >
    > We took an Associated Press book to work, with the beautiful picture of the
    > Earth rising over the moon taken during Apollo 8, at the time of their
    > famous Bible reading.  He had seen it on television, as well.
    >
    > He was still reluctant to believe, even in the face of such immediate
    > evidence.  He finally accepted, but many of his order did not.
    >
    > It was his change that impressed me, not the original views.  Some people
    > have difficulty understanding that those bright things out there at night
    > are stars, as I read in AStronomy magazine.
    >
    > John Kabel
    > London, Ontario
    >

    Well, you know of course that the whole moon landing thing was faked
    right out here at what used to be Norton Air Force Base which
    is now San Bernardino International Airport less than a stone's
    throw from where I live. Norton is where the Air Force photography
    headquarters were. All the photography archives used to be there.
    The whole lunar landing thing was done in an aircraft hanger.
    Grin.

    BTW, if you think about it, if the Earth were flat, celestial navigation
    wouldn't work. You would get the same sextant altitude reading for the
    same time of the sun at every latitude, since the sun is so close it's
    rays can be considered parallel.

    -- Gordon

    Gordon - The above shows another insidious case of the all too common computer rebellion, where your keyboard mis-responded to your touch, and entered "close" when you thought and typed "far"! 
     
    I think that part of the flat-earther argument assumes a much-closer sun to enable "different sextant altitude reading(s) for the same time of the sun at every latitude", where the sun's rays are not parallel because it is only a few "earth-widths" away.
     
    tesB redargs, (oops, now my keyboard is doing it too!)
    Best regards, Marvin
    osugeography---.com
     

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