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    Re: Survival at Sea, Stove by an Orca
    From: Bill Lionheart
    Date: 2020 Jan 13, 12:37 +0300
    I stand corrected. The book by the son "The Last Voyage of the Lucette" says they had an SSB radio.   https://books.google.co.ke/books?id=QIEfsO-Z9gQC&lpg=PA91&ots=CtSUQyoDuW&dq=robertson%20%20Lucette%20radio&pg=PA91#v=onepage&q=radio&f=false

    Also I searched the book for "sextant", it seems I was wrong, there is half a dozen descriptions of celestial navigation but it seems they did not take the sextant with them when they abandoned ship

    Bill

    On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 at 09:12, Bill Lionheart <billlionheart---.com> wrote:
    >
    > I meant "1970s" probably late 70s.
    >
    > Bill
    >
    > On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 at 09:07, Bill Lionheart <billlionheart---.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > I read the book Survive the Savage Sea in the 1970 when it came out. I
    > > didnt read the book by the son though. It was very influential on my
    > > thinking about sea survival and voyaging by small boat at the time,
    > > even though it was many decades before I bought my own blue water
    > > cruiser. It says in the BBC article he fired up his radio and sent an
    > > SOS. I don't remember them having a suitable radio. At the time they
    > > might have had a 500kHz life boat unit, a 2182kHz "call buoy" or an HF
    > >  ham rig, Marine MF/HF rigs were huge at that time and used loads of
    > > power so it is unlikely they had one. The nearest to an EPIRB was a
    > > 121.5 aeronautical beacon which relied on line of sight to a plane.
    > >
    > >  I seem to remember he threw a sextant and a chart in the boat before
    > > they sank, and a knife which was the most crucial thing to their
    > > survival.
    > >
    > > Bill
    > >
    > > On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 at 03:48, Frank Reed <NoReply_FrankReed@fer3.com> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Here's a story of a schooner in the Pacific sailing from the Galapagos to the Marquesas that was sunk by a killer whale:
    > > > https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200108-how-to-survive-being-shipwrecked-by-whales
    > > >
    > > > They all survived in a little dinghy, and there's a point where they were able to estimate their latitude by sighting Polaris (not much detail in the article but you get the idea). As I started into the article, I was waiting for the part about the EPIRB but then in the fifth paragraph I realized why there was no EPIRB. The article is a good read by itself, and it's such a low key advert that I find myself interested in buying and reading the book on which it's based.
    > > >
    > > > Frank Reed
    > > >
    > > > View and reply to this message
       
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