Welcome to the NavList Message Boards.

NavList:

A Community Devoted to the Preservation and Practice of Celestial Navigation and Other Methods of Traditional Wayfinding

Compose Your Message

Message:αβγ
Message:abc
Add Images & Files
    or...
       
    Reply
    Re: Slocum's lunars
    From: Fred Hebard
    Date: 2003 Dec 12, 13:03 -0500

    Herbert,
    
    I've been wondering about that!  It at least indicates an awareness of
    the procedure.
    
    Further on, he is very specific about the longitude in which he crossed
    the equator.  Then comes a passage that may have been cited already,
    evidence against him taking lunars at that point in his voyage:
    
    "On one of the very fine days experienced after leaving Rio, the
    steamship South Wales spoke the Spray and unsolicited gave the
    longitude by chronometer as 48? W., "as near as I can make it," the
    captain said. The Spray, with her tin clock, had exactly the same
    reckoning. I was feeling at ease in my primitive method of navigation,
    but it startled me not a little to find my position by account verified
    by the ship's chronometer."
    
    I might add that he was coasting on the way down from Rio, so may have
    been getting fixes by reference to land.  Also, in the passage down
    past the Cape Verdes, he had fairly frequent landfalls, so may not have
    felt he drifted enough from his DR position to need to find his
    longitude by lunar, which is not precise enough, in general, to trust
    for a close approach to land.
    
    Fred
    
    On Dec 12, 2003, at 12:43 PM, Herbert Prinz wrote:
    
    > Hello Fred,
    >
    > I can't follow the logic of your argument. Why does this statement
    > imply
    > that Slocum made more than one lunar observation?
    >
    > Herbert Prinz
    >
    >
    > Fred Hebard wrote:
    >
    >> Here's one
    >> statement implying he made more than that one in the South Pacific.
    >> After leaving Gibralter in Chapter 5, he says, "On September 10 the
    >> Spray passed the island of St. Antonio, the northwesternmost of the
    >> Cape Verdes, close aboard. The landfall was wonderfully true,
    >> considering that no observations for longitude had been made."  This
    >> implies he may have made more than that one in the South Pacific, but
    >> also indicates he kept a close DR.
    >
    
    
    

       
    Reply
    Browse Files

    Drop Files

    NavList

    What is NavList?

    Join NavList

    Name:
    (please, no nicknames or handles)
    Email:
    Do you want to receive all group messages by email?
    Yes No

    You can also join by posting. Your first on-topic post automatically makes you a member.

    Posting Code

    Enter the email address associated with your NavList messages. Your posting code will be emailed to you immediately.
    Email:

    Email Settings

    Posting Code:

    Custom Index

    Subject:
    Author:
    Start date: (yyyymm dd)
    End date: (yyyymm dd)

    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site