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    Re: Radium illumination
    From: George Huxtable
    Date: 2010 Sep 6, 18:13 +0100

    Thanks to Greg for a helpful suggestion. I'm sure that headband light is a
    really useful tool on board, and I've considered buying something of the
    sort, without actually getting round to it yet.
    
    However, I have an uncurbable tendency to look for snags, perhaps even
    where none exist. It seems to me that shining a light on the body of the
    compass, at an angle, as that head-light does, isn't the best way to
    illuminate the internal scale of such a compass, at night. Some light must
    reflect back into the eye from the body of the compass, which must, it
    seems to me, detract from the observer's night-vision: at least to some
    extent. The situation I'm envisaging, which frequently occurs,  is taking a
    bearing of an intermittently flashing light that's only marginally visible,
    right at the limit of distance; or perhaps even the loom of such a light
    below the horizon.
    
    The original Tritium lighting, and the dimly-lit LED that have replaced it
    in my compass, have the advantage of providing a faint disc of light,
    illuminating the compass scale just where it's needed and nowhere else, and
    leave vision of an object on the horizon above it quite unaffected.
    
    Is Greg really telling us that the head-band light does an equally good
    job?
    
    George.
    
    contact George Huxtable, at  george@hux.me.uk
    or at +44 1865 820222 (from UK, 01865 820222)
    or at 1 Sandy Lane, Southmoor, Abingdon, Oxon OX13 5HX, UK.
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Greg Rudzinski" 
    To: 
    Sent: Monday, September 06, 2010 4:04 PM
    Subject: [NavList] Re: Radium illumination
    
    
    George,
    
    I would like to offer a solution to your mini hand bearing compass problem.
    See the linked photo showing yours truly with the same model of compass
    that you have that is illuminated by a waterproof Princeton Tec LED head
    lantern ($20) which is directionally adjustable, has three brightness
    levels, and a red,green or blue filter for night blindness protection. I
    like the green filter.  The Princeton Tec has been one of the most useful
    devices aboard for sail handling, anchoring, and of course BBQing at night.
    It is great at the chart table and when rowing or kayaking. Makes for easy
    reading of the watch and sextant during twilight as well. Lots of reasons
    to have one.
    
    There is magnetic influence from the AAA battery only when held very close
    to the compass. If the head lantern is on the head three or more inches
    from the compass then the compass card is not deflected.
    
    Greg Rudzinski
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