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    Re: Fwd: Principles and Being Practical
    From: Courtney Thomas
    Date: 2003 Sep 11, 23:12 -0500

    I just ordered it based on your recommendation.
    
    Courtney
    
    HGWorks - Phil Guerra wrote:
    
    > Courtney,
    >
    > Susan Powell's book includes HO229 fragments needed to do the exercises, and
    > the US Navy site, I gave in the last message has some links to the different
    > volumes of the HO 229, and HO249, so either way would work.  Have you seen
    > the Susan Powell book?
    >
    > Phil
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Courtney Thomas" 
    > To: 
    > Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2003 8:06 PM
    > Subject: Re: Fwd: Principles and Being Practical
    >
    >
    >
    >>Thanks again Phil.
    >>
    >>I have the HO 249 set. I just wondered if Susan Howell's book would
    >>apply equally well to 249 as 229.
    >>
    >>Cordially,
    >>Courtney
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>HGWorks - Phil Guerra wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Basically,
    >>>
    >>>The methods are closely related, being different in the tables used to
    >>>acquire the data in the sight reduction, and some technique variations.
    >>>
    > The
    >
    >>>HO 249 is a 3 volume set originally designed for use by aviation
    >>>
    > navigators,
    >
    >>>and the HO 229 is an six volume set, with far more solutions.  However,
    >>>
    > the
    >
    >>>HO229 is costly and probably not the most widely used by other than the
    >>>
    > most
    >
    >>>serious navigators.  That's why short tables, such as Bayless, and
    >>>
    > Ageton
    >
    >>>are still used, though not as much with the advent of cheap navigation
    >>>computers and GPS.
    >>>
    >>>Really, though I think you can adapt from either, it just takes finding
    >>>
    > your
    >
    >>>way through one of the methods and getting a good feel for it.  Again,
    >>>
    > I'm
    >
    >>>sure others could help you assess which one is right for you.  The
    >>>
    > precision
    >
    >>>of the HO 229 is probably more than you need on a regular basis, but you
    >>>never know what you miss until you don't have it.  Check out the US Navy
    >>>site to read more about it, and take a look at their great documentation
    >>>
    > and
    >
    >>>computer utilities at this site:
    >>>http://aa.usno.navy.mil/publications/
    >>>
    >>>Still if you need to move quickly, you may need to contact a Sailing /
    >>>Navigation School.  My desk rarely moves, so I've got a little more time
    >>>
    > to
    >
    >>>play with than you, I suspect.
    >>>
    >>>Take care,
    >>>
    >>>Phil
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>----- Original Message -----
    >>>From: "Courtney Thomas" 
    >>>To: 
    >>>Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2003 5:22 AM
    >>>Subject: Re: Fwd: Principles and Being Practical
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Phil,
    >>>>
    >>>>Thank you for the book information.
    >>>>
    >>>>What is the difference between HO 249 and HO 229 techniques ?
    >>>>
    >>>>Cordially,
    >>>>Courtney
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>HGWorks - Phil Guerra wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Sorry for the tardy reply.  Yes, I've got Mary Blewitt's book, as well,
    >>>>>although, I've misplaced it.  I found it to be a really good reference,
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>and
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>it's compact size made it easy to take to work for reading on my
    >>>>>
    > breaks.
    >
    >>>If
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>I remember correctly, she uses the H.O.249 to do sight reductions.
    >>>>>
    > Other
    >
    >>>>>methods are given some mention, but not really examined.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The book I really worked through was Susan Powell's Practical Celestial
    >>>>>Navigation.   It's more like a workbook giving lots of examples and
    >>>>>solutions.  She uses the H.O. 229 for her sight reduction work.  I
    >>>>>
    > think,
    >
    >>>>>the method you use depends on your specific needs.  What's most
    >>>>>
    > important
    >
    >>>is
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>that you know your method down pat, and have a backup method or two.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I know many of the list's group could tell you more, I've no real
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>experience
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>in actual on-board CN.  I'm just in awe and admire all who are able to
    >>>>>
    > do
    >
    >>>>>it.  I enjoy the mechanics of the process of CN because it emcompasses
    >>>>>
    > so
    >
    >>>>>many of my interests into an area that uses them all.  Good luck to
    >>>>>
    > you.
    >
    >>>>>Phil Guerra
    >>>>>www.hgworks.com
    >>>>>----- Original Message -----
    >>>>>From: "Courtney Thomas" 
    >>>>>To: 
    >>>>>Sent: Sunday, September 07, 2003 4:29 PM
    >>>>>Subject: Re: Fwd: Principles and Being Practical
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Phil,
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Thanks so much for the fulsome reply.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I am a non-armchair sailor and am trying to find the best, i.e.
    >>>>>>
    > easiest
    >
    >>>>>>that meets real world navigational needs, CN technique rather than a
    >>>>>>more abstract interest but thank goodness for such.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I suspect Newton would've probably been a poor farmer but gratefully
    >>>>>>
    > so.
    >
    >>>>>>For now I just don't want to waste time/energy learning one technique
    >>>>>>
    > to
    >
    >>>>>>later learn that it was not the most suitable.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>It's not that it is intrinsically uninteresting it's that my agenda is
    >>>>>>reversed, at this time.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Incidentally, are you familiar with Mary Blewitt's book ? If yes, what
    >>>>>>do you think of it ?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Cordially,
    >>>>>>Courtney
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>HGWorks - Phil Guerra wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>The Ageton method is not discussed in Bennett's book.  It is really a
    >>>>>>>compact treatment of the subject designed for use on-board.  As far
    >>>>>>>
    > as
    >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>the
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>best explanation of the method, I never really found anything more
    >>>>>>>
    > than
    >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>his
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>book, "Manual of Celestial Navigation" in print.  I found the book by
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>chance
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>in a used book store, but have seen it offered on Ebay for around an
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>average
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>price of 10-20 dollars (US).  Unfortunately, the book is not really a
    >>>>>>>'teaching guide' but probably was used to supplement classroom
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>instruction.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>Another, offshoot of the method was put forward by Allan E. Bayless,
    >>>>>>>"Compact Sight Reduction Table", again using a slight modification of
    >>>>>>>Ageton's method.  This book is out of print as well, and I found a
    >>>>>>>
    > copy
    >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>on
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>Ebay.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>My expanding CN library includes, Bowditch, Dutton's Navigation &
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>Piloting,
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>which all refer to the method, but really do not give it much
    >>>>>>>
    > clarity,
    >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>at
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>least for me coming in as a novice.  This lead me to ask questions on
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>this
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>list about it.  I did find a good description on a referenced web
    >>>>>>>
    > site
    >
    >>>>>>>http://home.t-online.de/home/h.umland/page3.htm, by Henning Umland,
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>which
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>cleared up most of the questions regarding how to use it, as his
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>authored,
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>"The Ageton Tables", gives some good description of the method,
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>examples,
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>and solutions.  Umland did expand the method a bit by providing a new
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>set of
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>tables to give it more accuracy.  The site is a great starting point
    >>>>>>>information regarding CN in general, and he has a lot of very useful
    >>>>>>>
    > CN
    >
    >>>>>>>links.   After going through Umland's article, I was able to go back
    >>>>>>>
    > to
    >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>the
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>Bowditch and Dutton books and understand the terse descriptions and
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>work
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>the
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>examples yielded the solutions.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I've begun work on using the information gleamed from all of my
    >>>>>>>
    > sources
    >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>to
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>produce a web site to teach the method, but it's stalled at present
    >>>>>>>
    > due
    >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>to
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>other responsibilities.  However, if you need help understanding it,
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>let
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>me
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>know via my existing web site www.hgworks.com using the Contact Us
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>page.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>I
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>found that building the web application to use Ageton gave great
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>accuracy
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>with the mathematical model, and using the table values gave it such
    >>>>>>>accuracy that it was, I believe in use for over 30 years, before
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>falling
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>out
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>of favor, due to technological advancements.  There are questions of
    >>>>>>>accuracy in Azimuth calculation, and it is documented.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Although, I'm a 'deskbound navigator', others who I've come into
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>contact
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>with on this list, indicate that the methods and books are still used
    >>>>>>>on-board, which is testament to the value of the work done.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Hope this helps,
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Phil Guerra
    >>>>>>>www.hgworks.com
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>----- Original Message -----
    >>>>>>>From: "Courtney Thomas" 
    >>>>>>>To: 
    >>>>>>>Sent: Sunday, September 07, 2003 4:15 AM
    >>>>>>>Subject: Re: Fwd: Principles and Being Practical
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>Is Ageton's method described in Bennett's book ? If not, where is
    >>>>>>>>
    > the
    >
    >>>>>>>>best exegesis of it, please ?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>Thank you.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>Dr. Geoffrey Kolbe wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>George Huxtable has pointed up a potential problem with the azimuth
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>tables
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>in George Bennett's book "The Complete On-board Celestial
    >>>>>>>>>
    > Navigator".
    >
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>He
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>has shown that there can be errors in computed azimuth of (at
    >>>>>>>>>
    > least)
    >
    >>>15
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>degrees where the celestial body is that sort of distance away from
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>the
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>prime vertical.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Peter Fogg tells us that this is "nit-picking" and that in any
    >>>>>>>>>
    > case,
    >
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>the
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>book tells us that, "In extreme cases the table should be
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>interpolated
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>when
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>observations have been made in the vicinity of the prime vertical."
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>I do not have the second edition, only the 1999-2003 edition where
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>this
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>phrase is not present. Perhaps Peter can tell us just what
    >>>>>>>>>
    > "extreme"
    >
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>means
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>in this context? When do we know we are in an extreme case? George
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>also
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>posed some other pertinent questions to Peter and I too would be
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>interested
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>to see the answers...
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>I also wonder just how much of a problem it would cause having your
    >>>>>>>>>near-prime-vertical azimuths off by around 15 degrees? For a
    >>>>>>>>>
    > cluster
    >
    >>>of
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>star sights, say, a prudent navigator would also be taking sights
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>from
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>objects far away from the prime vertical (to get useful angular
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>separation)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>and this would tend to mitigate any problems due to bad
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>near-prime-vertical
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>azimuths. The inaccuracy of the tables near the prime vertical are
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>also
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>mitigated by being able to assess independently (in many cases) in
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>which
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>azimuth quadrant the celestial object sits.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>If your estimated position is pretty close (say, within 10 nautical
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>miles)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>to your actual position then I cannot think of any circumstances
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>where
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>it
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>would significantly affect the sort of accuracy we would expect
    >>>>>>>>>
    > from
    >
    >>>CN
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>in
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>a small boat at sea, which is the sort of user the book was aimed
    >>>>>>>>>
    > at
    >
    >>>in
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>first place. I have not thought deeply on this problem and I would
    >>>>>>>>>appreciate the thoughts of other listers who will have greater
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>insight
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>on
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>this problem than I.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>The "short" method of sight reduction used by Bennett is popular
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>because
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>the computed altitude can be arrived at quite quickly. But a
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>different
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>procedure is required to calculate an azimuth and this rather takes
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>the
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>gilt off this method. Ageton's method, by contrast, requires more
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>steps
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>to
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>get to the calculated altitude, but the azimuth then drops out very
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>quickly
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>and is accurate. Azimuth quadrant ambiguities are also easily
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>resolved.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>Too, only one set of tables is required for the Ageton method.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Geoffrey Kolbe
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>-------------------8<---------------------
    >>>>>>>>>From: George Huxtable
    >>>>>>>>>The problem with these azimuth tables ...
    >>>>>>>>>is not in their ambiguity, but in their inaccuracy, and that
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>inaccuracy
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>is
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>exactly what I have complained about. And there is not one word, no
    >>>>>>>>>
    > t
    >
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>even
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>a
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>hint, in the book that major errors in azimuth can occur, for
    >>>>>>>>>
    > certain
    >
    >>>>>>>>>observations in a VERY wide swathe around East or West.
    >>>>>>>>>-------------------8<---------------------
    >>>>>>>>>>From Peter Fogg
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Inserted in second edition is . "In extreme cases the table should
    >>>>>>>>>
    > be
    >
    >>>>>>>>>interpolated when observations have been made in the vicinity of
    >>>>>>>>>
    > the
    >
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>prime
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>vertical and/or LHA, declination and latitude require substantial
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>rounding
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>off before using the table. When in doubt use the Weir diagrams.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>In practice you could happily sail across an ocean and never notice
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>this
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>supposed problem, particularly by following the common sense
    >>>>>>>>>
    > approach
    >
    >>>>>>>>>outlined previously. With nav. it it often a case of one system
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>checking
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>another. In fact taking sights and working out a fix is a check on
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>the
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>basic tool of running a DR.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>If the whole book has been subjected to the same searching
    >>>>>>>>>
    > criticism
    >
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>and
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>this rather inconsequential nit-pick is the only flaw found, then
    >>>>>>>>>
    > it
    >
    >>>is
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>>>>>really a back-handed compliment to the book as a whole. A ferocious
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>critic
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>seems to think the rest works just fine.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Border Barrels Ltd., Newcastleton, Roxburghshire, TD9 0SN,
    >>>>>>>>>
    > Scotland.
    >
    >>>>>>>>>Tel. +44 (0)13873 76253 Fax. +44 (0)13873 76214.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>--
    >>>>>>>>Courtney Thomas
    >>>>>>>>s/v Mutiny
    >>>>>>>>lying Oriental, NC
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>--
    >>>>>>Courtney
    >>>>>>s/v Mutiny
    >>>>>>lying Oriental, NC
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>--
    >>>>Courtney Thomas
    >>>>s/v Mutiny
    >>>>lying Oriental, NC
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>
    >>--
    >>Courtney
    >>s/v Mutiny
    >>lying Oriental, NC
    >>
    >>
    >
    
    
    --
    Courtney
    s/v Mutiny
    lying Oriental, NC
    
    
    

       
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