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    Re: Mathematical Question
    From: Robert Eno
    Date: 2002 Sep 19, 23:18 -0400

    This is going to be a tough one!
    
    I don't mean a spherical triangle but you are all on the right track...
    
    Let's say you were to start at the north pole of a sphere and then excised
    the portion of the sphere from 90 degrees to 80 degrees. Now let's say you
    are just excising the surface portion. It would have a spherical surface but
    would be lens shaped.
    
    I'm starting to confuse even myself.
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Vic Fraenckel 
    To: 
    Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2002 9:47 PM
    Subject: Re: Mathematical Question
    
    
    > Is this not a spherical triangle? Prehaps I misunderstand your
    description?
    >
    > Vic
    > ________________________________________________________
    >
    > Victor Fraenckel - The Windman                 vfraenc1{at}nycap.rr.com
    > KC2GUI
    www.windsway.com
    >
    >       Home of the WindReader Electronic Theodolite
    >                                Read the WIND
    >
    > "Victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory however
    long
    > and hard the road may be; for without victory there is no survival."
    > - Winston [Leonard Spencer] Churchill (1874 - 1965)
    >
    > Dost thou not know, my son, with how little wisdom the world is governed?
    > -Count Oxenstierna (ca 1620)
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Robert Eno" 
    > To: 
    > Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2002 9:09 PM
    > Subject: Re: Mathematical Question
    >
    >
    > | Ok, let's say that it has a lensatic shape and a circular base. What
    would
    > | it be called?
    > |
    > | I may have erred in my description. I guess and arc is two dimensional
    > | whereas it's spherical equivalent would be three dimensional.
    > |
    > |
    > | ----- Original Message -----
    > | From: Brian Whatcott 
    > | To: 
    > | Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2002 9:02 PM
    > | Subject: Re: Mathematical Question
    > |
    > |
    > | > At 07:30 PM 9/19/02, you wrote:
    > | > >Greetings list,
    > | > >
    > | > >Given the rather esoteric nature of some of the recent discussions, I
    > am
    > | > >hopeful that one of you will have the answer to a long-standing
    > question
    > | > >of mine.
    > | > >
    > | > >What is the term used to describe a small 2 dimensional section of a
    > | > >sphere? Or to put it another way, if a small section of a circle is
    > | called
    > | > >an "arc", what is the equivalent in a sphere?
    > | > >
    > | >
    > | > A spherical surface may have an irregular perimeter, or be a
    > | > spherical triangle, or spherical polygon, or a spherical segment of
    one
    > | base
    > | >   according to
    > | > Math Dictionary, James & James, Van Nostrand.
    > | >
    > | >
    > | >
    > | > Brian Whatcott
    > | >    Altus OK                      Eureka!
    > | >
    > |
    >
    
    
    

       
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