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    Re: Lunar Distance in Wikipedia
    From: Fred Hebard
    Date: 2007 Jul 25, 08:56 -0400

    Frank,
    
    I hope you feel I said the same thing in my final reply to George.
    
    Fred
    
    On Jul 25, 2007, at 2:43 AM, Frank Reed wrote:
    
    >
    > Fred you wrote:
    >> Another meaning for zenith given by the Oxford English Dictionary
    >> (http://www.askoxford.com/concise_oed/zenith?view=uk) is "the highest
    >> point in the sky reached by a given celestial object."  This is an
    >> additional meaning to the point directly overhead.  However, both the
    >> Wikipedia and Encyclopedia Britannica mention only the point directly
    >> overhead.  It would appear the scientific usage is restricted to the
    >> point directly overhead.
    >
    > Just remember that the OED also includes 'incorrect' usages since, by
    > their standards, usage is king, and therefore there's almost no such
    > thing as incorrect usage (apart from pure typographic errors). So, for
    > example, "irregardless" is in the OED despite the fact that no one
    > with any pride in their usage of English would be caught dead using
    > it. For scientific terminology, there's clearly correct usage and
    > incorrect usage. For the modern scientific use of the word, zenith,
    > it's the point straight up, the single point 90 degrees away from the
    > astronomical horizon. And by the way, that's the only way it's defined
    > in the back of the modern Bowditch. Of course, "zenith" also has a
    > metaphoric meaning in non-scientific usage: something is "at its
    > zenith" when it has peaked in some sense, so you might read about the
    > "Roman Empire at its zenith" or perhaps an "actor's career at its
    > zenith". When that metaphoric usage is turned back and applied to the
    > original astronomical case, then we see this odd idea of the "Sun at
    > its zenith" when trying to say that it has reached its maximum
    > altitude. No one trying to communicate navigational or astronomical
    > concepts should use zenith that way. The zenith is straight up. That's
    > all.
    >
    > -FER
    >
    >
    > >
    
    
    
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