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    Re: Lookout by Sound
    From: Greg Rudzinski
    Date: 2009 Oct 16, 09:17 -0700

    Jeremy,
    
    On a small sailboat in fog it is quite helpful to be tuned in with the
    ears and listening for breakers, horns, whistles, bells, engines, and
    even voice. I am surprised at how far I can hear regular conversation
    when all is quiet (1/4 mile). Even more surprising is how far a cigar
    can be smelled if down wind (over a mile). For a commercial vessel
    with roaring diesels it is very difficult to hear much and I agree
    that monitoring the VHF is important. A hand held VHF with a mic by
    the ear receives well on a line of sight but transmission is best done
    at 25 watts through the antenna on the mast.
    
    Greg
    
    On Oct 16, 3:41�am, Anabasi...@aol.com wrote:
    > Ah the navy, with the hordes on the bridge. �We "merchies" don't have �such
    > luxuries (although I think everyone is using navigational radar these �
    > days). �The "lookout by sound" always seemed a bit of a stretch for me in �most
    > cases. �What exactly are we listening for? �Horns? Bells? �Seagulls? �By the
    > time I actually hear most of these, even a LOUD ship's �whistle, I am
    > probably well into imminent danger on a 600 foot merchant ship as �the range of
    > hearing is no better than a mile and that is assuming no wind �howling over
    > the bridge wing. �By the time I hear a bell buoy, it is just �off the rail ab
    > out amidships; and this is on an open bridge wing. �What if �I am in the
    > actual bridge navigating/maneuvering? (many new ships have �totally enclosed
    > bridge/wing's with NO outside deck). �You can't hear much �in there, even with
    > the doors open.
    >
    > While trying not to totally disregard looking out by sound, I have to put �
    > it into perspective, and understand that my best lookout by sound is a close
    > �watch on the VHF radio for stations calling me, not listening for whistle �
    > signals or navaids. �I have a lot of data coming at me constantly up there �
    > and sound data is at the bottom of the list. �I have to rely mostly on my �
    > eyes and instruments for both navigation and collision avoidance. �The only �
    > time I may try to get another person on the bridge to help listen is in
    > serious �fog where I can't see the bow. (In that case I might have 4 people up
    > there �including the Master).
    >
    > Jeremy
    >
    > In a message dated 10/15/2009 2:32:45 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, �
    >
    > byron...@netzero.com writes:
    >
    > I �don't want to hit hard on this BUT the ears of the lookout should be
    > an �important part of the lookout job. �From the "Watch Officers
    > Guide." �"See that they have some means of rapid commuications with the
    > bridge; they �should not, however, wear phones.'(use voice �tube)
    >
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