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    Re: Geographical Center Problem
    From: Dan Allen
    Date: 2001 Jul 25, 5:59 PM

    Neat maps!  I don't see how the smallest traveling distance can be
    58,000 nautical miles.  The farthest you can get on the planet is
    about 12,000 nautical miles from another spot.
    
    Well, we seem to have a basic idea now about where the geographical
    center is of 20 people, and with a bunch of fooling around I now
    believe we have a pretty good measure of things.
    
    Dan
    
    -----Original Message-----
    From  Navigation Mailing List
    [mailto:NAVIGATION-L{at}LISTSERV.WEBKAHUNA.COM]On Behalf Of R.H. van Gent
    Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2001 3:59 PM
    To: NAVIGATION-L{at}LISTSERV.WEBKAHUNA.COM
    Subject: Re: Geographical Center Problem
    
    
    Dan Allen wrote:
    
    > I have summarized the results so far on a new web page of mine.
    >
    > http://www.nwlink.com/~danallen/center.htm
    >
    > The center is currently located somewhere in Hudson Bay, which for
    > some reason doesn't seem right.  I am going to keep studying this
    > interesting geographical problem.
    
    When the Hudson Bay is taken as the map centre of an orthogonal view of
    the Earth, its location does not look so strange as it is indeed roughly
    centred between the positions in the US and Europe (the few positions
    elsewhere do not carry enough weight to significantly alter the 'centre
    of gravity')
    
    I have prepared two maps at
    
      http://www.phys.uu.nl/~vgent/images/sphere1.gif
      http://www.phys.uu.nl/~vgent/images/sphere2.gif
    
    The 'centre of gravity' is shown on the first map as a blue dot and the
    20 red dots on both indicate our positions as listed on Dan Allen's web
    page.
    
    On both maps, my IDL program has also drawn contour lines for the total
    distance (in units of 1000 nautical miles) that everyone will have to
    travel (as the proverbial crow flies along a great circle trajectory) to
    get there. The smallest travelling distance is a little less than 58,000
    nautical miles and the largest possible is a little more than 158,000
    nautical miles.
    
    In out case, the optimum location (as far as travel distance is
    concerned) is in the Great Lakes Region and close to the position of the
    'centre of gravity'.
    
    ========================================================
    * Robert H. van Gent * Tel/Fax:  00-31-30-2720269      *
    * Zaagmolenkade 50   *                                 *
    * 3515 AE Utrecht    * E-mail: r.h.vangent{at}astro.uu.nl *
    * The Netherlands    *                                 *
    ********************************************************
    * Home page: http://www.phys.uu.nl/~vgent/homepage.htm *
    ========================================================
    

       
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