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    GPS EOW rollover
    From: Richard B. Emerson
    Date: 1999 Aug 26, 10:06 PM

    FYI - the enclosed was posted to CANSPACE list.
    
    Rick
    S/V One With The Wind, Baba 35
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    U. S Air Force ONLINE NEWS    25 August 1999
    
    WASHINGTON -- If it's true that no news is good news, then the Global
    Positioning System rollover late Aug. 21 was the best of news for the Air
    Force.
    
    Air Force officials confirm the GPS, including the 27-satellite
    constellation and its network of ground support stations operated by Air
    Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., continued functioning
    normally before, during and after its date rollover which occurs every 20
    years. This event is similar to the broader rollover for other computer
    systems which will occur in Y2K.
    
    The GPS, which counts time in epochs of 1,024 weeks vs. using traditional
    solar years, rolled over to 0000 for the first time since 1980, when the
    system's internal clock began.
    
    Air Force officials confirm the GPS, including the 27-satellite
    constellation and its network of ground support stations operated by Air
    Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., continued functioning
    normally before, during and after the rollover.
    
    The watch began when experts at AFSC uploaded the new almanac containing
    week 0000 information Aug. 19 at 6 p.m. EDT. Air Force users began testing
    their receivers that evening, with no failures reported.
    
    Saturday evening was much the same following the approximate 8 p.m. EDT
    rollover.
    
    "The GPS uses composite readings from 230 atomic clocks around the world to
    track absolute and relative time down to a nanosecond," said Bill Lubera,
    Air Force Materiel Command Year 2000 Program Office. GPS receivers, he
    explained, are used for everything from local- and wide-area networks to
    bank automated teller machine systems, public utilities, radar nets and
    cellular phone towers to synchronize transactions and transmissions.
    
    If GPS users worldwide detected any anomalies, they reported them to
    controllers at the GPS User Support Center, Colorado Springs, Colo., and the
    GPS Joint Program Office, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif. The data was
    then passed to the Air Force Fusion Center at Standard Systems Group at
    Maxwell Air Force Base, Gunter Annex, Ala., for correlation with information
    being received from other Air Force units.
    
    The GPS data was then reported to the Air Force Operations Center at the
    Pentagon. (Courtesy HQ Air Force Materiel Command and Standard Systems Group
    Public Affairs)
    

       
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