Welcome to the NavList Message Boards.

NavList:

A Community Devoted to the Preservation and Practice of Celestial Navigation and Other Methods of Traditional Wayfinding

Compose Your Message

Message:αβγ
Message:abc
Add Images & Files
    or...
       
    Reply
    Re: F tables - "F-Tafel"
    From: Hewitt Schlereth
    Date: 2013 Jan 30, 13:23 -0800

    Thanks, Dave. Too pricey for me. I'll just figure it's a lot like Dreisenstok 
    and let it go at that.  Hewitt
    
    Sent from my iPad
    
    On Jan 30, 2013, at 1:05 PM, "Dave Walden"  wrote:
    
    > 
    > F-tafel, tafel zur vereinfachten berechnung von höhenstandlinien. Im auftage 
    des Oberkommandos der Kriegsmarine herausgegeben von der Deutschen seewarte.
    > Corporate Author:    Deutsche Seewarte.
    > Language(s):    German
    > Published:    Hamburg, 1941.
    > Edition:    3. aufl.
    > Subjects:    Azimuth.
    > Note:    In upper right corner of t.-p.: 2154.
    > Physical Description:    xxiii, 88 p. 30 cm.
    > Original Format:    Book
    > Original Classification Number:    VK 563 .H19 1941
    > Locate a Print Version:    Find in a library
    > 
    > *******************
    > ABEBOOKS.COM
    > 
    > F-Tafel. Tafel zur vereinfachten Berechnung von Höhenstandlinien. Im 
    Auftrage des Oberkommandos der Kriegsmarine herausgegeben von der Deutschen 
    Seewarte.
    > 
    >    * Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Lutz Bäsler (Bad Homburg, Hess, Germany)
    >    * Bookseller Rating: 3-star rating
    >    * Quantity Available: 1
    > 
    > Add to basket
    > 
    > Price: £ 42.35 
    > 
    > ******************************
    > 29S[U].—Hamburg, Deutsche Seewarte, publication no. 2154, F-Tafel.
    > Tafel zur vereinfachten Berechnung von Höhenstandlinien. 3 Auflage.
    > Hamburg, August, 1941. xxiii, 88 p. 19.6 X 29.2 cm. In the third
    > edition there were extensions and corrections of the introductory material,
    > and of 8 of the 11 tables.
    > The method and principal table of this volume are similar in many respects to those of
    > H. O. 208 (Dreisonstok, see MTAC, v. 1, p. 79f). The astronomical triangle is divided
    > into two right spherical triangles by a perpendicular from the zenith upon the hour circle
    > of the star; U is the co-declination of the foot of the perpendicular, and V is log cos B,
    > where B is the angle subtended at the zenith by U. By Napier's rules,
    > tan U = cos I cot L
    > and
    > sin B = sin / cos L,
    > where /, L, and d are the local hour angle, latitude and declination respectively. By applying
    > another of Napier's rules to the right triangle of which the star is one vertex, the altitude,
    > h, may be found by
    > sin h = cos B sin (d + U)
    > or
    > log sin h = V + log sin (d + U).
    > For the determination of azimuth, Z, two more auxiliary quantities are introduced,
    > P which is the great circle distance from the star to the east- or west-point of the horizon,
    > and Gr. 4 which is the declination of the intersection of the hour circle of the star with the
    > prime vertical. Thus, sin t cosd ■>c osP and sin Z = cos P sec h. Also, tan Gr. S = tan L cos t.
    > 82 RECENT MATHEMATICAL TABLES
    > In Table F I, with vertical argument, latitude 0(1°)70°, and horizontal argument,
    > local hour angle 0(4m)6h, three values per page, there are tabulated four quantities, U to
    > the nearest O'.l, V to 5D, Gr. 5 and P, each to the nearest 0?1. In the second part of
    > Table F I, the vertical argument is latitude, 70°(1°)90°, and the horizontal argument is
    > local hour angle 0(4m)6h, nine values per page, three in each horizontal section.
    > At ths bottom of the vertical columns in Table F I are azimuths; entering the left
    > hand column with altitude as argument, and moving across the pages horizontally until one
    > finds under P, the value already copied out, one can drop to the bottom of the column
    > and read off the azimuth angle. Since the tabulated values of the azimuth angle go up to
    > 90° only, it is necessary to have another device to determine the quadrant. When the
    > hour angle is greater than 6b, the azimuth is measured from the elevated pole; when the
    > local hour angle is less than 6h and L and d are of opposite name, the azimuth is measured
    > from the depressed pole. If the local hour angle is less than 6h and L and d are of the same
    > name, the azimuth is measured from the elevated or depressed pole according as the declination
    > is greater or less than the quantity Gr. a.
    > In case the altitude is great, or the azimuth near 90°, the value of the azimuth may be
    > poorly determined by the use of Table F I. In such a case, it will be noted that the value
    > of P lies below a dotted line running across the page. One must then use instead Table
    > F XI, which gives P to the nearest minute of arc and the variation in P corresponding to
    > 1' change in d or h.
    > Table F II is a table of log sin x, x = [0(0'-1)6°(1')90°; 5D], with generous tables of
    > proportional parts.
    > Tables F DI and F IV represent the principal advantages this volume possesses over
    > other similar tables; they permit one to determine the corrections (to the nearest 0!1) to
    > the computed altitude corresponding to slight changes in time (up to 2m by 10* steps) or latitude
    > (up to 30' by 1' steps) respectively. In both cases, one can interpolate very easily by a
    > shift of the decimal point. Table F III is a well-designed triple-entry table occupying only
    > five pages; one starts down the column at the left headed by the value nearest the assumed
    > latitude, stops at the value nearest the computed azimuth and moves to the right to the
    > column headed by the number of seconds change in time. Table F IV is a small doubleentry
    > table on a single page; the vertical argument is azimuth 0(5°)20°(2°)90°, and the
    > horizontal argument is change in latitude, l'(l')10'(10')30'. These two tables allow one to
    > work either with an assumed position or with a dead reckoning position.
    > Table F V is for changing time into angular measure and conversely. Table F VI gives
    > the corrections for refraction, semi-diameter and parallax to be applied to the altitude
    > (3°-90°) of the lower- or upper-limb of the moon; there is a supplementary table for height
    > of eye. Table F VU gives the combined correction for refraction and height of eye (0-30
    > meters) to be applied to the altitudes (3°-90°) of fixed stars or planets. Table F VIH yields
    > the correction for refraction, semi-diameter and height of eye (0-30 meters) to be applied
    > to altitudes (3°-90°) of the sun's lower limb; there are also two auxiliary tables to provide
    > corrections to the altitudes to take care of the varying semi-diameter of the sun through the
    > year, and for the case where the sun's upper limb was observed. The latter takes only a
    > very small amount of space and would seem to be quite worthwhile. Tables F IX and F X
    > provide similar corrections for use with the bubble sextant.
    > The tables are well printed on a good grade of paper. In a number of cases, the rules
    > needed to make decisions as to quadrants, etc. are printed on each page. As for the accuracy
    > of the tabulated values, only a few rounding off errors of a unit in the last place were
    > discovered in a brief examination.
    > Charles H. Smiley
    > Brown University
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------
    > NavList message boards and member settings: www.fer3.com/NavList
    > Members may optionally receive posts by email.
    > To cancel email delivery, send a message to NoMail[at]fer3.com
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------
    > 
    > 
    > 
    > 
    > View and reply to this message: http://fer3.com/arc/m2.aspx?i=122177
    > 
    > 
    
    
    
    

       
    Reply
    Browse Files

    Drop Files

    NavList

    What is NavList?

    Join NavList

    Name:
    (please, no nicknames or handles)
    Email:
    Do you want to receive all group messages by email?
    Yes No

    You can also join by posting. Your first on-topic post automatically makes you a member.

    Posting Code

    Enter the email address associated with your NavList messages. Your posting code will be emailed to you immediately.
    Email:

    Email Settings

    Posting Code:

    Custom Index

    Subject:
    Author:
    Start date: (yyyymm dd)
    End date: (yyyymm dd)

    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site
    Visit this site