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    Re: Artificial horizon question
    From: Jackie Ferrari
    Date: 2009 Apr 20, 08:12 +0100

    I've got good results for the moon and sun in a bucket of water on calm days
    . I once tried a star and managed its reflection ok using the method Gary
    mentions. This was in Italy up in the mountains so no light pollution but I
    do recall the reflection was still very faint and the results not too good.
    
    Jackie.
    
    
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Gary LaPook" 
    To: 
    Sent: Monday, April 20, 2009 2:44 AM
    Subject: [NavList 7993] Re: Artificial horizon question
    
    
    >
    > Mercury has traditionally been used for an artificial horizon (see Lewis
    > & Clark) and it is easy to shoot stars using Mercury. It is rather hard
    > to come by these days and is not cheap and some worry about its safety
    > (I'm not one of them if used with care.)
    >
    > The second part of your question, compute in advance the approximate
    > altitude of the star, double it and set your sextant to this value and
    > then look for the star in the reflecting pool. The navigational stars
    > are well separated and are bright so there should be no trouble in
    > getting the right star.
    >
    > gl
    >
    > P H wrote:
    >> Dear NavList Members,
    >>
    >> Since the nearest ocean is hundreds of miles away from where I live, I
    >> must use an artificial horizon in order to work with my sextant.  A
    >> pan filled with water works fine enough for me for observations of the
    >> moon at night and the sun.  Now these days both the sun and the moon
    >> are simultaneously visible during the day, which would allow for a fix
    >> on one's position - if the altitudes of both bodies can be measured.
    >> As you probably can guess, with all the glare I was unable to observe
    >> the reflection of the moon... so here is my question: are there any
    >> tricks that would allow one to construct a usable artificial horizon
    >> for the daytime observation of the moon?  And to take it one notch
    >> further, how about an artificial horizon for the stars and planets (at
    >> night, of course)?  Are there any systematic methods to ensure that
    >> the star reflected on the surface is indeed the one I intend to observe?
    >>
    >> Many thanks.
    >>
    >>
    >> Peter Hakel
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >
    >
    > >
    >
    
    
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