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    Re: Ancient mariners enjoyed Hawaiian holidays
    From: Gary LaPook
    Date: 2007 Oct 31, 12:38 -0700

    I have had  "We The Navigators" on my bookshelf for many years and it
    is a very intresting discription of the navigational techniques used
    by ancient pacific voyagers.
    
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0824815823/ref=sib_dp_pt/105-6149226-0956425#reader-link
    
    gl
    
    On Oct 31, 12:33 pm, Winchurch  wrote:
    > A more up-to date discussion of the methods of Micronesian navigation
    > can be found in a recent book (1987) by Steve Thomas.  Thomas sailed
    > with one of the few remaining practitioner's of the ancient methods.
    > Thomas comes with notable sailing credentials and his account provides
    > some useful insights.
    >
    > Dick
    >
    > Michael Daly wrote:
    > > Clive wrote:
    >
    > >> How do you find its direction and how do you deduce that its direction is
    > >> unexpected and therefore of navigable interest ?
    >
    > > Very good point and I'm guilty of not thinking critically about this
    > > info.  Most of my experience with currents is in inland waters where
    > > they can be quite visible (like a line of bubbles between two slightly
    > > different coloured areas of water) as in two big rivers meeting or a
    > > river flowing into a large lake.
    >
    > > On the ocean, you'd be swept along with it and, out of sight of land as
    > > you say, there's no point of reference.  I suppose the only means of
    > > detecting the current is if it regularly swept along flotsam (of the
    > > natural kind) and it could be identified from a distance as one
    > > approached.  Knowing nothing of Pacific currents, I can't say there's
    > > any location where this wild hypothesis is possible.
    >
    > >> It is conceivable the pacific islanders navigated over long distances,
    > >> although I remain unconvinced that they did so with any prepared passage
    > >> plan, but principally I argue that it would be impossible to navigate using
    > >> this method.
    >
    > > If they ran regular trade routes, I can see it possible to do the
    > > planning.  However, your contention that using currents is not feasible
    > > is valid until I or someone can identify a legitimate way to do it.
    >
    > > Mike
    
    
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